Book Reviews

Book Review | Now I Love You, Now I Don’t by Shoma Narayanan

DisclaimerI received a free paperback of this book from Rizwan Khan of Rupa Publications India and I’d like to thank him for the same. The review is my honest opinion about the book and I have NOT received any monetary compensation for the same.

I’ve read a couple of romance novels by Shoma Narayanan and had liked the easy flow of her writing. I had quite liked how she had paced her stories well; the stories weren’t too fast nor did  they drag. So when I was offered a chance to review Now I Love You, Now I Don’t, I took up the opportunity!

Now I Love You, Now I Don’t is the story of two independent women, Anjali and Zina, who are trying to live their lives on their own terms. The story begins with Zina running away from her wedding, and Anjali getting back with her estranged husband (quite an irony, isn’t it).

Anjali moves with her husband, Sushil, daughter, Gayatri, to a posh locality in Mumbai and does all she can to fit into the lifestyle that is drastically different from the one she is used to in Indore. Zina, meanwhile, is coming to terms with having fallen for a guy, Ishaan, who is too young for her. The women make a lot of choices as they go along in life, some conventional, some unconventional.

There were two more reasons why I chose this book.

One of them was the colorful cover, which I later realized was a very accurate glimpse of the two lead characters of this novel. Here’s an image of the cover, for you to know what I am raving about!

now-i-love-you-now-i-dont_with-watermark

Another one was my craving for a comfort book. I really needed to read a book that I knew was good and was a breezy read; I really was not in for any heavy duty or badly written stuff! This book was a perfect match to all my requirements, and I am glad I picked up this one!

The story moves along well and is peppered with a lot of other characters who come out to be very interesting. Especially, Anjali’s father. You are sure to laugh out loud every time there is a scene involving the man!

The relationship between Anjali and Sushil comes across as very genuine; the way they try to mend their broken relationship is very endearing. What’s also endearing is how Anjali finds a foothold for herself in a strange city, using her skills to establish a career. She makes friends with some unique and slightly weird people, also playing cupid on the way. Add to the mix a teenage daughter who is trying to make her place in a swanky school, and you are in for some entertainment.

Zina’s character is beautiful too, and her relationship with Ishaan can be described as cute. However, I thought I could connect more with Anjali and Sushil than with Zina and Ishaan.

A lovely addition to the reading experience of this book is the letters that Gayatri writes to her grandfather, Anjali’s father. The letters are a beautiful insight into what goes on in the mind of the child when her life changes, even while the adults and their ups and downs take center stage.

My biggest disappointment with this book was the blurb! I thought that the story and the blurb were a little disconnected on one particular bit.

Nonetheless, the book does not disappoint. The story is as colorful as the cover and is well-written in terms of language, vocabulary, and grammar.

My rating:

I’ll give this book a 4/5.

 

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